The Life & Times of an Auteur.

Commentary on Pop Culture, and maybe creating some of my own.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Why I Dislike JLU's Cadmus Arc


"I think I'll wear this to the State of the Union."

This is one of those entries that I know I'm going to get killed over, but this is my opinion. If you don't like it, well I am confident you will let me know.

The DC Animated Universe is, in many ways, the "Star Trek" franchise of animation. So many interconnected shows, in a semi-coherent universe. Like "Star Trek", most of it wasn't really serialized. There would be call-backs quite a bit and continuity nods, but most of it consisted of stand alone episodes and occasional multi-parters. Deep Space Nine broke the mold later in it's run when the Dominion War began to heat up, and when Justice League Unlimited came about, into that show's second season, it tried something no other DCAU series ever attempted. An ongoing story arc.

"My known association with this man should guarantee my front runner status."

The Cadmus arc came about as a response to the idea of the Superman and the Justice League going rogue, as they could easily subjugate or even destroy the world. The League answered to no one. There was no oversight, and no accountability. So Cadmus was founded by Amanda Waller as a means to level the playing field, and bring the League down if necessary. I thought the idea was fascinating and had a lot of promise.

Sadly, I thought the Cadmus arc didn't live up to the promise it had shown. The fact is, the League can be dangerous. Cadmus was a natural response. But the moment things got too nuanced, out comes the convenient bad guy for them to punch in the face. As Hawkgirl said "less talking, more hitting." We discovered that Lex Luthor was funding Cadmus as a means to discredit the League, as well as running for President of the United States in an orchestrated scheme to piss Superman off. Now I need to get into this. I am not a fan of the DCAU version of Lex Luthor. At all. Clancy Brown's great voice aside, this version of Lex Luthor belonged in the 80's as he was no more competent or interesting than the likes of Skeletor. 

"George Dubya got arrested for drunken disorderly conduct once. I should be fine."

And why was his campaign for President such a concern anyway? The man was openly a supervillain and had been arrested and convicted of selling weapons to terrorists (in a post-9/11 world!) When he announced he was running, Superman shouldn't have been nervous, Superman should have just raised an eyebrow. The League should have been laughing at the very idea. It's like Donald Trump running for President x 100. Donald Trump has no chance of actually winning the presidency. The DCAU version of Lex Luthor should have even less of a chance. Imagine if Greg Weisman had Demona, not Dominique Destine, but Demona run for President with a legitimate shot at winning it. Imagine if Marvel had the Green Goblin becoming the most powerful man in the United States government, it's that stupid... oh wait, that last one actually happened. Whoops.

If you remove Lex Luthor and Brainiac from the Cadmus arc, it would have been much, much better. More interesting. More nuanced. More mature. Such potential, but sadly that potential was squandered. And if they really, really wanted to use Lex Luthor in this fashion, they should have thought ahead and not had him be openly a supervillain leading the Injustice Gang. Once they did that, Luthor's role in the Cadmus arc was no longer probable or believable and they should have found another candidate to fill the role. Lex Luthor becoming Secretary General of the United Nations at the end of "Young Justice" wasn't the same crime because while we in the audience as well as the League and the Team know what Lex is, as far as we know he's never had his image tarnished to the public. Such is the beauty of planning ahead.